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anti MOTION SICKNESS ear plug       PRECISION MADE INSTRUMENT IN FORM OF AN EAR PLUG
DATA and FAQ
LAPPONIA LTD
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The vestibular system, which contributes to our balance and our sense of spatial orientation, is the sensory system that
provides the dominant input about movement and
equilibrioception. Together with the cochlea, a part of the auditory system, it
constitutes the labyrinth of the inner ear, situated in the vestibulum in the inner ear (Figure 1). As our movements consist of
rotations and translations, and the otoliths, which indicate linear accelerations. The vestibular system sends signals primarily
to the neural structures that control our eye movements, and to the muscles that keep us upright. The projections to the former
provide the anatomical basis of the
vestibulo-ocular reflex (Figure 3), which is required for clear vision; and the projections to
the muscles that control our posture are necessary to keep us upright.  
Individuals and animals without a functional vestibular
system are immune to motion sickness.
Vestibular System:
Figure 1: The labyrinth of the inner ear, from the left
ear. It contains 1) the cochlea (yellow), which is the
peripheral organ of our auditory system; and the
vestibular system; 2) the semicircular canals (brown),
which transduce rotational movements; and 3) the
otolithic organs: Saccule and Utricle (in the
blue/purple pouches), which transduce linear
accelerations. The light blue pouch is the
endolymphatic sac, and contains only fluid. 4) the
vestibule (not pictured)
Figure 3: The vestibulo-ocular reflex. A rotation of the
head is detected, which triggers an inhibitory signal to
the extraocular muscles on one side and an excitatory
signal to the muscles on the other side. The result is a
compensatory movement of the eyes.  The
vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) is a reflex eye movement
that stabilizes images on the retina during head
movement by producing an eye movement in the
direction opposite to head movement, thus preserving
the image on the center of the visual field. For example,
when the head moves to the right, the eyes move to the
left, and vice versa. Since slight head movements are
present all the time, the VOR is very important for
stabilizing vision: patients whose VOR is impaired find it
difficult to read, because they cannot stabilize the eyes
during small head tremors. The VOR reflex does not
depend on visual input and works even in total darkness
or when the eyes are closed.
Figure 2: Push-pull system of the semicircular canals,
for a horizontal head movement to the right.  The
canals are arranged in such a way that each canal on
the left side has an almost parallel counterpart on the
right side. Each of these three pairs works in a
push-pull fashion: when one canal is stimulated, its
corresponding partner on the other side is inhibited,
and vice versa.

This push-pull system allows us to sense all
directions of rotation: while the right horizontal canal
gets stimulated during head rotations to the right (Fig
2), the left horizontal canal gets stimulated (and thus
predominantly signals) by head rotations to the left.

Vertical canals are coupled in a crossed fashion, i.e.
stimulations that are excitatory for an anterior canal
are also inhibitory for the contralateral posterior, and
vice versa.
Figure 4:  The Labyrinth of the Inner Ear: 1) The
Vestibular System:  Vestibule, Saccule, Utricle with
Semicircular Canals and  2) Cochlea.
The Vestibule is the central part of the labyrinth,
The semicircular canals are three half-circular,
interconnected tubes located inside each ear. The three
canals are the horizontal semicircular canal, superior
semicircular canal (also known as anterior semicircular
canal), and the posterior semicircular canal.
Cochlea is a part of the auditory system.
The labyrinth of the inner ear is a system of fluid passages in the inner ear, including both the cochlea, which is part of the
auditory system, and the vestibular system, which provides the sense of balance.
The bony labyrinth, or osseous labyrinth, is the network of passages with bony walls lined with periosteum. The bony
labyrinth is lined with the membranous labyrinth. There is a layer of perilymph between them. The three parts of the bony
labyrinth are the vestibule of the ear, the semicircular canals, and the cochlea.
The vestibular system is the region of the inner ear where the semicircular canals converge, close to the cochlea (the
hearing organ). The vestibular system works with the visual system to keep objects in focus when the head is moving. Joint
and muscle receptors also are important in maintaining balance. The brain receives, interprets, and processes the
information from these systems that control our balance.
Click the link or the picture below on the right side to see
the theoretical
Schematic picture of human balance systems maximum measuring capability and its edge
with the NATURAL disturbance and the functional Goal of reductive effect of the instrument to lower its measuring capability,
when in use with its different mouthpieces.
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LINKS:
PRODUCTS:
Links of interest:
The vestibulocochlear nerve (also known as the auditory or acoustic nerve) is the eighth of twelve cranial nerves, and is
responsible for transmitting sound and equilibrium (balance) information from the inner ear to the brain.  (It consists of the
cochlear nerve, carrying information about hearing, and the vestibular nerve, carrying information about balance).
Semicircular Canals, Utricle, Saccule
and Vestibule
CLICK THIS SIDE OF THE PICTURE TO SEE THE
FUNCTIONAL PRINCIPLES OF THE INSTRUMENT
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